Vincent Van Gogh used to eat yellow paint because he thought it would get the happiness inside him. Many people thought he was mad and stupid for doing so because the paint was toxic, never mind that it was obvious that eating paint couldn’t possible have any direct correlation to one’s happiness, but I never saw that. If you were so unhappy that even the maddest ideas could possible work, like painting the walls of your internal organs yellow, than you are going to do it. It’s really no different than falling in love or taking drugs. There is a greater risk of getting your heart broken or overdosing, but people still do it everyday because there was always that chance it could make things better. Everyone has their yellow paint.

megumiaino:

let me get this straight. *grabs the nearest heterosexual* now where were we

(via trolllinginthedeep)

sailormichelle:

hey everyone !So my mom’s been feeling really down lately and i’m really hoping you guys can help me try to make her feel better.
She cosplays the cabbage merchant from avatar and she’s often self conscious about leaving the hotel room at cons, so i’m hoping you can help me make her popular on tumblr. she’s really cute and sweet and she worked so hard on this cosplay! she even carries around real cabbages please give her love ok

sailormichelle:

hey everyone !
So my mom’s been feeling really down lately and i’m really hoping you guys can help me try to make her feel better.

She cosplays the cabbage merchant from avatar and she’s often self conscious about leaving the hotel room at cons, so i’m hoping you can help me make her popular on tumblr. she’s really cute and sweet and she worked so hard on this cosplay! she even carries around real cabbages please give her love ok

(via stickinemwithpointyendsandlace)

http://xdominoe.tumblr.com/post/82442868612

betterhimymendings:

Robin and Barney don’t break up. Barney starts a blog that actually becomes popular.

Lily has Daisy but not a third child. She runs an art gallery and also paints her own stuff. She’s not super famous but she’s well-known. Marshall becomes a judge and that Supreme thing.

im5-official:

gutterdyke:

dr-cormier:

lightspeedsound:

divergentshadowhunting:

thedadruiner:

o shit

setting the record straight

Oh look, the media casually blaming underaged girls for their unwilling involvement with adult men

 

you go girl

LOOK AT THE BLONDE NEWSWOMAN!! SHE IS LIKE FUCK YEAH! YOU GO

(Source: nayariverasunderboob, via writeroost)

tuukka-rask:

if a girl wants to watch a sport because she thinks a player is hot then let her, it’s not like guys watch the VS fashion show because they want to buy new bras. 

(via stickinemwithpointyendsandlace)

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

(via takeoffmyclothesaladdin)

lohgan:

This sums up my life pretty well

lohgan:

This sums up my life pretty well

(via xdominoe)

rustboro:

martymcflyinthefuture:

Today is the day that Marty McFly goes to the future!

Where is my hoverboard

rustboro:

martymcflyinthefuture:

Today is the day that Marty McFly goes to the future!

Where is my hoverboard

(via xdominoe)

inked-virtue:

dxcade:

DO U EVEN LIFT MR WAYNE

Literal burn

(Source: rooftoqs, via stickinemwithpointyendsandlace)